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Black Swan (2011) Review

RELEASED: 21 January 2011

As 2011 draws ever closer to an end, The Smoovie wants to looks back at one of the most magnificent, raunchy and refreshing films of the year. Coming off the back of critically acclaimed The Wrestler (2009), promising and exciting American director Darren Aronofsky flaunts his stuff with Black Swan.

Nina Sayers (Natalie Portman) is a highly talented ballerina in a company headed by Thomas Leroy (Vincent Cassel), and becomes excited by the prospect of filling the role of Queen Swan, now vacant due to the ended career of Beth Macintyre (Winona Ryder). But Lily, fresh from San Francisco, joins the troupe, and Sayers must battle with the newcomer in a complex relationship full of sexual tension, schizophrenia, and madness. It all gets very psychological.

Black Swan is a master class in directing, provided to us courtesy of Aronofsky. The handheld single camera filming takes us right to the heart of the ballet, to where the battle for one’s inner desires takes place. It is terrific stuff, filled with thrilling and pretty gory moments. Aronofsky is able to render self-inflicted face stabbing as artistic. The attention to detail is quite frankly sublime, from the ritual of reinforcing the ballet shoes, to the consciousness of Sayers controlling her eating in the quest for perfection.

And Aronofsky has a knack for bringing out the best of his actors. You only have to think back to Mickey Rourke’s role in The Wrestler and his subsequent Oscar nomination. Portman has everything that you want to see from a role of this complexity: struggle with her inner demon, passion for the girl she can’t have, and a rollercoaster display of emotions from the plain angry to the sensuously erotic. Barbara Hershy veers between obsessively coddling to creepily demonic at times, in a truly harrowing portrayal of Nina’s mother that no doubt contributes to her mental issues. Even Kunis, whose most notable roles are in sitcoms and romcoms, gives us a truly respectable performance, especially in handling some of the risqué material.

Black Swan pirouettes and glides across the screen to a conclusion that is most fitting, and even if it does not reach “perfection” as Nina so brilliantly does, it gets very damn close.